Research Reports

HEI’s mission is to provide credible science to support environmental regulations and other policy decisions. The results of each HEI-funded project undergo peer-review by outside scientists and the Health Review Committee. The HEI Research Reports contain the Investigator’s Report and the Review Committee’s evaluation of the study, summarized in a Commentary or short Critique.

ISSN 1041-5505 (print)        ISSN 2688-6855 (online) 

Research Report 197
Nga L Ng
Wing Y Tuet
Yunle Chen
Shierly Fok
Dong Goa
Marlen S Tagle Rodriguez
Mitchel Klein
Anna Grosberg
Rodney J Weber
Julie A Champion
2019

Research Report 197 describes a study led by Dr. Nga Ng to characterize and compare the oxidative properties of ambient particulate matter and laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosols in toxicologic assays.

Research Report 199
Xiaoliang Wang
Andrey Khlystov
Kin-Fai Ho
Dave Campbell
Judith C Chow
Steven D Kohl
John G Watson
Shun-cheng Frank Lee
Lung-Wen Antony Chen
Minggen Lu
Steven Sai Hang Ho
2019

Research Report 199 describes a study led by Dr. Xiaoliang Wang evaluating how mobile-source emissions have changed by examining real-world emissions characterization in two traffic tunnels: the Shing Mun Tunnel in Hong Kong and the Fort McHenry Tunnel in Baltimore, Maryland.

Research Report 196
Jeremy A Sarnat
Armistead (Ted) G Russell
Donghai Liang
Jennifer L Moutinho
Rachel Golan
Rodney J Weber
Dong Gao
Stefanie Ebelt Sarnat
Howard H Chang
Roby Greenwald
Tianwei Yu
2018

Research Report 196, Developing Multipollutant Exposure Indicators of Traffic Pollution: The Dorm Room Inhalation to Vehicle Emissions (DRIVE) Study, describes a study by Dr. Jeremy A. Sarnat that evaluated single- and multipollutant metrics of exposure to traffic-related air pollutants near and farther away from a major highway in Atlanta, as well as biological markers in a panel of students.

Research Report 195
Armistead (Ted) G Russell
Paige E Tolbert
Lucas RF Henneman
Joseph Abrams
Cong Liu
Mitchel Klein
James A Mulholland
Stefanie Ebelt Sarnat
Yongtao Hu
Howard H Chang
Talat Odman
Matthew J Strickland
Huizhong Shen
Abiola Lawal
2018

Research Report 195 describes a study led by Ted Russell at the Georgia Institute of Technology as part of HEI’s Accountability Research Program. Dr. Russell and colleagues examined the extent to which regulations targeting power plants and mobile sources in the Atlanta area were effective in improving air quality and ultimately reducing cardiorespiratory emergency department visits.

Research Report 194
Benjamin Barratt
Martha Lee
Paulina Wong
Robert Tang
Tsz Him Tsui
Wei Cheng
Yang Yang
Poh-Chin Lai
Linwei Tian
Thuan-Quoc Thach
Ryan Allen
Michael Brauer
2018

HEI’s Research Report 194 describes a study led by Benjamin Barratt of King’s College London, United Kingdom, that developed a dynamic three-dimensional land-use regression model for Hong Kong and used it to estimate exposure to traffic-related air pollution.

Research Report 193
Jiu-Chiuan Chen
Xinhui Wang
Marc Serre
Steven Cen
Meredith Franklin
Mark Espeland
2017

Research Report 193 describes a novel study by Jiu-Chiuan Chen and colleagues examining possible associations between long-term exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) and changes in the brains of older women in the United States. The study focused on brain volumes and neurocognitive outcomes, specifically mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Dr. Chen used neuroimaging and cognitive outcome data from women enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative Memory Study and estimated their exposure to ambient PM2.5 and to diesel PM.

Research Report 192 Part 1
Mark W Frampton
John R Balmes
Philip A Bromberg
Paul Stark
Mehrdad Arjomandi
Milan J Hazucha
David Q Rich
Danielle Hollenbeck-Pringle
Nicholas Dagincourt
Neil E Alexis
Peter Ganz
Wojciech Zareba
Maria G Costantini
2017

HEI Research Report 192 describes a multicenter study by John Balmes at the University of California–San Francisco, Phil Bromberg at the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, and Mark Frampton at the University of Rochester, New York. The study was designed to test whether ozone has short-term cardiovascular effects at present-day ambient levels. It evaluated respiratory and cardiovascular outcomes in 87 healthy participants (60 years old on average) who were exposed to 0, 70, or 120 ppb ozone for 3 hours while exercising moderately.

Research Report 191
Allison D Fryer
David B Jacoby
Sarah A Wicher
2017

Research Report 191 describes a study by Allison Fryer and colleagues that addressed how exposure to ozone affects the immune and physiological responses in guinea pigs. In her study, Dr. Fryer focused on eosinophils, white blood cells that play an important role in inflammation, allergies, and allergic asthma, and can modify the airway response to ozone inhalation. This study tested a novel hypothesis: that allergic guinea pigs react differently to ozone than normal animals because of newly formed eosinophils that migrate from bone marrow to the lungs.

Research Report 190
Frank Gilliland
Edward L Avol
Rob McConnell
Kiros T Berhane
W James Gauderman
Fred W Lurmann
Robert Urman
Roger Chang
Edward B Rappaport
Stephen Howland
2017

Research Report 190 describes a study by Frank Gilliland and colleagues that was funded under HEI’s Accountability research program. The investigators collected air quality data and lung function and respiratory symptoms in three cohorts of children who participated in the Children’s Health Study in Southern California. During the 20-year study period, nearly 20 major policy actions were implemented to reduce pollution from transportation and other sources. Gilliland and colleagues evaluated whether the improved air quality was associated with improved lung function and respiratory symptoms in these children.

Research Report 189
Zhengmin Qian
Bin Zhang
Shengwen Liang
Jing Wang
Shaoping Yang
Ke Hu
Edwin Trevathan
Rong Yang
Qijie Li
Louise H Flick
Ronghua Hu
Zhen Huang
Yimin Zhang
Shixiang Hu
Jing Wang
Longjiao Shen
Yuan Lu
Hui Peng
Yuzhen Yu
Li Yang
Wei Chen
Wenjin Liu
Wei Zhang
2016

HEI Research Report 189 describes a study by Dr. Zhengmin Qian conducted in Wuhan, the capital city of Hubei province in China. Wuhan experiences temperature extremes and generally has higher air pollution levels than those seen in the United States and Europe. Dr. Qian examined whether increased exposures to air pollutants (particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and ozone) during vulnerable pregnancy periods were associated with increased rates of preterm birth, low birth weight, or intrauterine growth retardation, using both a cohort and nested case-control design.