Ozone & Oxidants

This page has a list of publications and news articles related to Air Pollution - Ozone and Oxidants. Find more information about our research on Air Pollution.

Unpublished Report
William E Kraus
Elizabeth R Hauser
Susanne Breitner
Alexandra Schneider
Akihiko Nishimura
Damian M Craig
Svati H Shah
October 2018

This unpublished report describes a three-year study aimed at examining the effects of short-term and long-term air pollution exposure on cardiovascular disease outcomes in a high-risk population, linking biomarker and genomic data to air quality data. Kraus and colleagues at Duke University used previously collected data from CATHGEN, a cohort of approximately 7,000 individuals undergoing coronary artery catheterization in North Carolina between 2001 and 2010.

Newsletter
Health Effects Institute
May 2018

This issue of Update highlights the report of a major new HEI study, Impacts of Regulations on Air Quality and Emergency Department Visits in the Atlanta Metropolitan Area, 1999–2013, led by Armistead (Ted) Russell of the Georgia Institute of Technology; the public release of data from HEI’s major ozone study, the Multicenter Ozone Study in oldEr Subjects (MOSES); a new HEI panel conducting a literature review on the health effects of traffic-related air pollution; the publication of State of Global Air 2018; appointment of two new members to the Institute’s Board of Directors; a new chair of the HEI Research Committee; and more.

Spring 2018 Update now available

May 30, 2018

This issue of Update highlights the report of a major new HEI study, Impacts of Regulations on Air Quality and Emergency Department Visits in the Atlanta Metropolitan Area, 1999–2013, led by Armistead (Ted) Russell of the Georgia Institute of Technology; the public release of data from HEI’s major ozone study, the Multicenter Ozone Study in oldEr Subjects (MOSES); a new HEI panel conducting a literature review on the health effects of traffic-related air pollution; the publication of State of Global Air 2018; appointment of two new members to the Institute’s Board of Directors; a new chair of the HEI Research Committee; and more.

Making the MOSES data and specimens available

May 14, 2018

HEI is making available to the public the database and material of the Multicenter Ozone Study in oldEr Subjects (MOSES). In the interest of scientific transparency and to encourage the broadest possible use of the data and the material, HEI has set up a streamlined process to access the data and the material (subject to the limited quantities available). The MOSES database may be accessed by anyone who is interested. Any qualified researcher from a not-for-profit US research center interested in doing specific analyses can request the samples.

Examining heart and lung effects from low ozone exposures in healthy older adults

June 29, 2017

HEI Research Report 192 describes a multicenter study by John Balmes at the University of California–San Francisco, Philip Bromberg at the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, and Mark Frampton at the University of Rochester, New York. The study was designed to test whether ozone has short-term cardiovascular effects at present-day ambient levels. It evaluated respiratory and cardiovascular outcomes in 87 healthy participants (60 years old on average) who were exposed to 0, 70, or 120 ppb ozone for 3 hours while exercising moderately. 

Spring 2017 Update now available

June 8, 2017

In the Spring 2017 Update, read about HEI’s forthcoming publication of a major report, Multicenter Ozone Study in Older Subjects; the briefing of key legislators and stakeholders on HEI’s Accountability Research Program; and a forthcoming study examining potential links between air pollution and dementia in older women. This issue also highlights worldwide media coverage of HEI’s State of Global Air Report 2017.

Newsletter
Health Effects Institute
June 2017

In this issue of Update, read about HEI’s forthcoming publication of a major report, Multicenter Ozone Study in Older Subjects; the briefing of key legislators and stakeholders on HEI’s Accountability Research Program; and a forthcoming study examining potential links between air pollution and dementia in older women. This issue also highlights worldwide media coverage of HEI’s State of Global Air Report 2017.

Research Report 192 Part 1
Mark W Frampton
John R Balmes
Philip A Bromberg
Paul Stark
Mehrdad Arjomandi
Milan J Hazucha
David Q Rich
Danielle Hollenbeck-Pringle
Nicholas Dagincourt
Neil Alexis
Peter Ganz
Wojciech Zareba
Maria G Costantini
June 2017

HEI Research Report 192 describes a multicenter study by John Balmes at the University of California–San Francisco, Phil Bromberg at the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, and Mark Frampton at the University of Rochester, New York. The study was designed to test whether ozone has short-term cardiovascular effects at present-day ambient levels. It evaluated respiratory and cardiovascular outcomes in 87 healthy participants (60 years old on average) who were exposed to 0, 70, or 120 ppb ozone for 3 hours while exercising moderately.

Ozone study tests hypothesis on protective role of eosinophils

March 22, 2017

Research Report 191 describes a study by Allison Fryer and colleagues that addressed how exposure to ozone affects the immune and physiological responses in guinea pigs. In her study, Dr. Fryer focused on eosinophils, white blood cells that play an important role in inflammation, allergies, and allergic asthma, and can modify the airway response to ozone inhalation. This study tested a novel hypothesis: that allergic guinea pigs react differently to ozone than normal animals because of newly formed eosinophils that migrate from bone marrow to the lungs.

Research Report 191
Allison D Fryer
David B Jacoby
Sarah A Wicher
March 2017

Research Report 191 describes a study by Allison Fryer and colleagues that addressed how exposure to ozone affects the immune and physiological responses in guinea pigs. In her study, Dr. Fryer focused on eosinophils, white blood cells that play an important role in inflammation, allergies, and allergic asthma, and can modify the airway response to ozone inhalation. This study tested a novel hypothesis: that allergic guinea pigs react differently to ozone than normal animals because of newly formed eosinophils that migrate from bone marrow to the lungs.