Publications

This page is a list of publications in reverse chronological order. Please use search or the filters to browse by research areas, publication types, and content types.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 294. Show 10 | 25 | 50 | 100 results per page.


Developing Multipollutant Exposure Indicators of Traffic Pollution: The Dorm Room Inhalation to Vehicle Emissions (DRIVE) Study

Jeremy A Sarnat
Armistead (Ted) G Russell
Donghai Liang
Jennifer L Moutinho
Rachel Golan
Rodney J Weber
Dong Gao
Stephanie Ebelt Sarnat
Howard H Chang
Roby Greenwald
Tianwei Yu
April 2018
Research Report 196

Research Report 196, Developing Multipollutant Exposure Indicators of Traffic Pollution: The Dorm Room Inhalation to Vehicle Emissions (DRIVE) Study, describes a study by Dr. Jeremy A. Sarnat that evaluated single- and multipollutant metrics of exposure to traffic-related air pollutants near and farther away from a major highway in Atlanta, as well as biological markers in a panel of students.

Impacts of Regulations on Air Quality and Emergency Department Visits in the Atlanta Metropolitan Area, 1999–2013

Armistead (Ted) G Russell
Paige E Tolbert
Lucas RF Henneman
Joseph Abrams
Cong Liu
Mitchel Klein
James A Mulholland
Stefanie Ebelt Sarnat
Yongtao Hu
Howard H Chang
Talat Odman
Matthew J Strickland
Huizhong Shen
Abiola Lawal
April 2018
Research Report 195

Research Report 195 describes a study led by Ted Russell at the Georgia Institute of Technology as part of HEI’s Accountability Research Program. Dr. Russell and colleagues examined the extent to which regulations targeting power plants and mobile sources in the Atlanta area were effective in improving air quality and ultimately reducing cardiorespiratory emergency department visits.

Update Winter 2018

Health Effects Institute
February 2018
Newsletter

This issue of Update highlights a major new HEI Special Report, Burden of Disease Attributable to Major Air Pollution Sources in India; three studies now underway to assess exposure to and health effects of traffic-related air pollution; and a new HEI Research Report on “Street Canyon” air pollution exposure modeling. Also in this edition, read about our upcoming Annual Conference; a recent meeting of diverse stakeholders hosted by HEI’s Energy Research Program; President Dan Greenbaum lending expertise to a National Academies “Grand Challenges” project; and more.

A Dynamic Three-Dimensional Air Pollution Exposure Model for Hong Kong

Benjamin Barratt
Martha Lee
Paulina Wong
Robert Tang
Tsz Him Tsui
Wei Cheng
Yang Yang
Poh-Chin Lai
Linwei Tian
Thuan-Quoc Thach
Ryan Allen
Michael Brauer
February 2018
Research Report 194

HEI’s Research Report 194 describes a study led by Benjamin Barratt of King’s College London, United Kingdom, that developed a dynamic three-dimensional land-use regression model for Hong Kong and used it to estimate exposure to traffic-related air pollution.

Annual Report 2017

Health Effects Institute
February 2018
Annual Report 2017

The 2017 Annual Report, A Voice for Accountability, describes the HEI model for delivering high-quality, impartial, and relevant science to inform public policy decisions about air quality and public health.

Burden of Disease Attributable to Major Air Pollution Sources in India

GBD MAPS Working Group
January 2018
Special Report 21

Special Report 21, Burden of Disease Attributable to Major Air Pollution Sources in India, provides the first comprehensive analysis of the levels of fine particulate matter air pollution in India by source and their impact on health. Household burning emissions (contributing to outdoor air) and coal combustion are the single largest sources of air pollution-related health impact. Emissions from agricultural burning, anthropogenic dusts, transport, other diesel, and brick kilns also contribute significantly.

Update Fall 2017

Health Effects Institute
October 2017
Newsletter

In this issue of HEI Update, read about the new ways HEI is making study data accessible; a literature review that HEI will soon initiate on the effects of exposure to traffic-related air pollution; two new members of the HEI Review Committee; and a newly published summary of an HEI expert workshop on the effects of fuel composition on particulate matter emissions.

Particulate Air Pollutants, Brain Structure, and Neurocognitive Disorders in Older Women

Jiu-Chiuan Chen
Xinhui Wang
Marc Serre
Steven Cen
Meredith Franklin
Mark Espeland
October 2017
Research Report 193

Research Report 193 describes a novel study by Jiu-Chiuan Chen and colleagues examining possible associations between long-term exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) and changes in the brains of older women in the United States. The study focused on brain volumes and neurocognitive outcomes, specifically mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Dr. Chen used neuroimaging and cognitive outcome data from women enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative Memory Study and estimated their exposure to ambient PM2.5 and to diesel PM.

Update Summer 2017

Health Effects Institute
August 2017
Newsletter

In this issue of HEI Update, read about the Haagen-Smit Clean Air Leadership Award given to HEI President Dan Greenbaum by the California Air Resources Board, the two 2017 recipients of HEI’s Walter A. Rosenblith New Investigator Award, and the progress of HEI studies examining potential health effects at low levels of air pollution. Also in this issue is a recap of HEI’s recent Annual Conference in Alexandria, Virginia.

Multicenter Ozone Study in oldEr Subjects (MOSES): Part 1. Effects of Exposure to Low Concentrations of Ozone on Respiratory and Cardiovascular Outcomes

Mark W Frampton
John R Balmes
Philip A Bromberg
Paul Stark
Mehrdad Arjomandi
Milan J Hazucha
David Q Rich
Danielle Hollenbeck-Pringle
Nicholas Dagincourt
Neil Alexis
Peter Ganz
Wojciech Zareba
Maria G Costantini
June 2017
Research Report 192 Part 1

HEI Research Report 192 describes a multicenter study by John Balmes at the University of California–San Francisco, Phil Bromberg at the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, and Mark Frampton at the University of Rochester, New York. The study was designed to test whether ozone has short-term cardiovascular effects at present-day ambient levels. It evaluated respiratory and cardiovascular outcomes in 87 healthy participants (60 years old on average) who were exposed to 0, 70, or 120 ppb ozone for 3 hours while exercising moderately.