Research Reports

HEI’s mission is to provide credible science to support environmental regulations and other policy decisions. The results of each HEI-funded project undergo peer-review by outside scientists and the Health Review Committee. The HEI Research Reports contain the Investigator’s Report and the Review Committee’s evaluation of the study, summarized in a Commentary or short Critique.

ISSN 1041-5505 (print)        ISSN 2688-6855 (online) 

Research Report 201
Lydia M Contreras
Juan C Gonzalez-Rivera
Kevin C Baldridge
Dongyu S Wang
Jamie CL Chuvalo-Abraham
Lea Hildebrandt Ruiz
July 2020

Research Report 201 presents a study led by Dr. Lydia Contreras at the University of Texas, Austin, who is a recipient of HEI’s Walter A. Rosenblith New Investigator Award. Dr. Contreras and colleagues evaluated how exposure of lung cells to volatile organic compounds plus ozone affects oxidation of ribonucleic acid, a key component of cells. The study aimed to improve understanding of the biological mechanisms by which air pollutants can cause effects in human health, thereby expanding our knowledge of potential causal links between exposure and health.

Research Report 192, Part 2
David Q Rich
Mark W Frampton
John R Balmes
Philip A Bromberg
Mehrdad Arjomandi
Milan J Hazucha
Sally W Thurston
Neil E Alexis
Peter Ganz
Wojciech Zareba
Petros Koutrakis
Kelly Thevenet-Morrison
March 2020

Research Report 192, Part 2, describes the second part of the Multicenter Ozone Study in oldEr Subjects (MOSES), led by Drs. David Rich and Mark Frampton of the University of Rochester Medical Center in Rochester, New York. Part 1 of the MOSES study, Effects of Exposure to Low Concentrations of Ozone on Respiratory and Cardiovascular Outcomes, was published in 2017; Part 2 presents additional analyses.

Research Report 202
Stuart Batterman
Veronica J Berrocal
Chad Milando
Owais Gilani
Saravanan Arunachalam
K Max Zhang
March 2020

Research Report 202 describes a study led by Dr. Stuart Batterman at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and colleagues. The investigators evaluated the ability to predict traffic-related air pollution using a variety of methods and models, including a line source air pollution dispersion model and sophisticated spatiotemporal Bayesian data fusion methods.

Research Report 203
Michael Brauer
Jeffrey R Brook
Tanya Christidis
Yen Chu
Dan Crouse
Anders Erickson
Perry Hystad
Chi Li
Randall V. Martin
Jun Meng
Amanda J. Pappin
Lauren L. Pinault
Michael Tjepkema
Aaron van Donkelaar
Scott Weichenthal
Richard T Burnett
November 2019

Research Report 203 describes the first-phase results of a study evaluating the relationship between long-term exposure to low concentrations of PM2.5 and non-accidental mortality, including a characterization of the shape of the concentration–response functions, in a large population-based cohort (~9 million adults) in Canada. The report also presents the detailed Commentary on the study by HEI’s Low-Exposure Epidemiology Studies Review Panel.

Research Report 200
Francesca Dominici
Joel Schwartz
Qian Di
Danielle Braun
Christine Choirat
Antonella Zanobetti
November 2019

Research Report 200 describes the first-phase results of a study examining any association between exposure to low levels of air pollution — both PM2.5 and O3 — and all-cause mortality in a population of 61 million Medicare enrollees residing in the continental United States. The report also presents the detailed Commentary on the study by HEI’s Low-Exposure Epidemiology Studies Review Panel.

Research Report 198
Jason D Surratt
Ying-Hsuan Lin
Maiko Arashiro
William G Vizuete
Zhenfa Zhang
Avram Gold
Ilona Jaspers
Rebecca C Fry
March 2019

Research Report 198 describes a study by Dr. Jason Surratt and his colleagues evaluating the toxicity of fine particulate matter formed from the photochemical oxidation of isoprene in a chamber.

Research Report 197
Nga L Ng
Wing Y Tuet
Yunle Chen
Shierly Fok
Dong Goa
Marlen S Tagle Rodriguez
Mitchel Klein
Anna Grosberg
Rodney J Weber
Julie A Champion
March 2019

Research Report 197 describes a study led by Dr. Nga Ng to characterize and compare the oxidative properties of ambient particulate matter and laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosols in toxicologic assays.

Research Report 199
Xiaoliang Wang
Andrey Khlystov
Kin-Fai Ho
Dave Campbell
Judith C Chow
Steven D Kohl
John G Watson
Shun-cheng Frank Lee
Lung-Wen Antony Chen
Minggen Lu
Steven Sai Hang Ho
March 2019

Research Report 199 describes a study led by Dr. Xiaoliang Wang evaluating how mobile-source emissions have changed by examining real-world emissions characterization in two traffic tunnels: the Shing Mun Tunnel in Hong Kong and the Fort McHenry Tunnel in Baltimore, Maryland.

Research Report 196
Jeremy A Sarnat
Armistead (Ted) G Russell
Donghai Liang
Jennifer L Moutinho
Rachel Golan
Rodney J Weber
Dong Gao
Stefanie Ebelt Sarnat
Howard H Chang
Roby Greenwald
Tianwei Yu
April 2018

Research Report 196, Developing Multipollutant Exposure Indicators of Traffic Pollution: The Dorm Room Inhalation to Vehicle Emissions (DRIVE) Study, describes a study by Dr. Jeremy A. Sarnat that evaluated single- and multipollutant metrics of exposure to traffic-related air pollutants near and farther away from a major highway in Atlanta, as well as biological markers in a panel of students.

Research Report 195
Armistead (Ted) G Russell
Paige E Tolbert
Lucas RF Henneman
Joseph Abrams
Cong Liu
Mitchel Klein
James A Mulholland
Stefanie Ebelt Sarnat
Yongtao Hu
Howard H Chang
Talat Odman
Matthew J Strickland
Huizhong Shen
Abiola Lawal
April 2018

Research Report 195 describes a study led by Ted Russell at the Georgia Institute of Technology as part of HEI’s Accountability Research Program. Dr. Russell and colleagues examined the extent to which regulations targeting power plants and mobile sources in the Atlanta area were effective in improving air quality and ultimately reducing cardiorespiratory emergency department visits.