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Databases

To facilitate high quality research, HEI has supported the development of several databases with air quality and health data that could be used by research teams for their projects, whether funded by HEI or other funding sources. As part of its policy on data access and transparency, researchers were provided with access to data and in some cases, software to analyze the data, for example with the iHAPPS database for the National Mortality and Morbidity of Air Pollution Study (NMMAPS). In other cases, data were made available to investigators in association with a specific Request for Applications, for example to provide access to the rich dataset of the Relationship of Indoor, Outdoor, and Personal Air (RIOPA) study for further analysis, and access to speciation data on fine particulate matter composition for the National Particle Component Toxicity (NPACT) initiative.

HEI Air Quality Database. This database was funded by HEI and prepared and maintained by Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER). It contained information on levels of PM2.5 components and gases from the EPA’s Chemical Speciation Network (CSN), as well as meteorological, population and other relevant data. It was made available in association with Request for Applications 05-1 and to other investigators interested in using the information for studies on air quality and health. See also the NPACT reports by Lippmann and Vedal. This database is no longer available.

RIOPA database. This database was funded by HEI and prepared and maintained by Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER). It contained information collected in the Relationships of Indoor, Outdoor, and Personal Air (RIOPA) study that was cofunded by HEI and the National Urban Air Toxics Research Center (NUATRC) and conducted in three cities with different air pollution source profiles: Los Angeles, California; Houston, Texas; and Elizabeth, New Jersey. The database was made available in association with Request for Applications 08-1. See also the RIOPA-related reports by WeiselTurpin, Batterman, and Ryan. This database is no longer available.

Internet-Based Health and Air Pollution Surveillance System (iHAPSS). iHAPSS was funded by HEI and developed and maintained by the Department of Biostatistics at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. It contained data and analytical software from the National Morbidity, Mortality and Air Pollution Study (NMMAPS). See also HEI Communication 12. This database is no longer available.