Publications

This page is a list of publications in reverse chronological order. Please use search or the filters to browse by research areas, publication types, and content types.

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Update Fall 2018

Health Effects Institute
November 2018
Newsletter

In this issue of Update, read about two important new HEI studies underway; a plan to intensively review and publish initial findings on PM2.5 from our “Low Exposure Levels” research program; our search for investigators to conduct new accountability and exposure assessment research; announcement of the 2018 Walter A. Rosenblith New Investigator Award recipient; and more.

Air Quality-by-Genomics Interactions in a Cardiovascular Disease Cohort

William E Kraus
Elizabeth R Hauser
Susanne Breitner
Alexandra Schneider
Akihiko Nishimura
Damian M Craig
Svati H Shah
October 2018
Unpublished Report

This unpublished report describes a three-year study aimed at examining the effects of short-term and long-term air pollution exposure on cardiovascular disease outcomes in a high-risk population, linking biomarker and genomic data to air quality data. Kraus and colleagues at Duke University used previously collected data from CATHGEN, a cohort of approximately 7,000 individuals undergoing coronary artery catheterization in North Carolina between 2001 and 2010.

Use of Real-Time Sensors to Assess Misclassification and to Identify Main Sources Contributing to Peak and Chronic Exposures

Juana Maria Delgado-Saborit
Adobi Okam
Maryam Shehab
Tuan van Vu
September 2018
Unpublished report

This unpublished report describes a three-year study aimed at evaluating exposures to air pollutants from traffic and indoor sources. The study followed a panel of participants who lived close to or further away from busy roads and had either gas or electric stoves. The investigators measured the participants’ exposures indoors and outdoors, as well as their personal exposures in various microenvironments, using real-time pollutant sensors that were fairly novel at the time.

Update Summer 2018

Health Effects Institute
August 2018
Newsletter

In this issue of Update, read about HEI’s recent testimony on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed “Strengthening Transparency in Regulatory Science” rule; a recap of the 2018 Annual Conference in Chicago, Illinois; a new HEI Communication assessing the evidence on health effects from household air pollution; progress in the new Energy Research Program; and more.

Household Air Pollution and Noncommunicable Disease

HEI Household Air Pollution Working Group
July 2018
Communication 18

Communication 18 provides a critical assessment of the state of the science examining the linkages between household air pollution formed by the burning of solid fuels and noncommunicable diseases. The report updates previous systematic reviews with the most recent studies. It answers fundamental questions on the scientific basis for estimating health burden and what the evidence suggests about the exposure reductions necessary to achieve improved health outcomes. The Summary for Policy Makers, based on Communication 18, presents the main conclusions about exposures to household air pollution and about its contribution to noncommunicable diseases globally.

Evaluation of Alternative Sensor-based Exposure Assessment Methods

Edmond Seto
Elena Austin
Graeme Carvlin
Jeffry Shirai
Alan Hubbard
Katherine Hammond
Ying-Ying Meng
Michael Jerrett
Ronald Cohen
July 2018
Unpublished report

This unpublished report describes a one-year study aimed at evaluating low-cost sensors in a dense network of near-road monitoring sites in the San Francisco Bay area. The overarching goal was to evaluate the ability of low-cost sensors to characterize traffic-related air pollution. The specific aims were to (1) colocate and compare low-cost sensors with regulatory instruments and (2) evaluate the ability of the low-cost sensors to characterize variations in traffic-related air pollution that are associated with different traffic counts. The topic of the study is of interest since the development and use of low-cost air pollution sensors are progressing rapidly, and these sensors have the potential to transform the way air pollution research is conducted.

HEI Investigators' Guide. Preparing the Final Report

Health Effects Institute
June 2018
Guide for Authors

The Investigators' Guide contains important information for HEI-funded investigators who are getting ready to write the Final Report for their study. The Guide introduces HEI's review, editing, and publication process and lists requirements for submission of the report. The Guide also contains detailed instructions on reference and text styles, tables and illustrations, and submission of electronic art.

Update Spring 2018

Health Effects Institute
May 2018
Newsletter

This issue of Update highlights the report of a major new HEI study, Impacts of Regulations on Air Quality and Emergency Department Visits in the Atlanta Metropolitan Area, 1999–2013, led by Armistead (Ted) Russell of the Georgia Institute of Technology; the public release of data from HEI’s major ozone study, the Multicenter Ozone Study in oldEr Subjects (MOSES); a new HEI panel conducting a literature review on the health effects of traffic-related air pollution; the publication of State of Global Air 2018; appointment of two new members to the Institute’s Board of Directors; a new chair of the HEI Research Committee; and more.

Developing Multipollutant Exposure Indicators of Traffic Pollution: The Dorm Room Inhalation to Vehicle Emissions (DRIVE) Study

Jeremy A Sarnat
Armistead (Ted) G Russell
Donghai Liang
Jennifer L Moutinho
Rachel Golan
Rodney J Weber
Dong Gao
Stephanie Ebelt Sarnat
Howard H Chang
Roby Greenwald
Tianwei Yu
April 2018
Research Report 196

Research Report 196, Developing Multipollutant Exposure Indicators of Traffic Pollution: The Dorm Room Inhalation to Vehicle Emissions (DRIVE) Study, describes a study by Dr. Jeremy A. Sarnat that evaluated single- and multipollutant metrics of exposure to traffic-related air pollutants near and farther away from a major highway in Atlanta, as well as biological markers in a panel of students.

Impacts of Regulations on Air Quality and Emergency Department Visits in the Atlanta Metropolitan Area, 1999–2013

Armistead (Ted) G Russell
Paige E Tolbert
Lucas RF Henneman
Joseph Abrams
Cong Liu
Mitchel Klein
James A Mulholland
Stefanie Ebelt Sarnat
Yongtao Hu
Howard H Chang
Talat Odman
Matthew J Strickland
Huizhong Shen
Abiola Lawal
April 2018
Research Report 195

Research Report 195 describes a study led by Ted Russell at the Georgia Institute of Technology as part of HEI’s Accountability Research Program. Dr. Russell and colleagues examined the extent to which regulations targeting power plants and mobile sources in the Atlanta area were effective in improving air quality and ultimately reducing cardiorespiratory emergency department visits.