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Publications

Use of Real-Time Sensors to Assess Misclassification and to Identify Main Sources Contributing to Peak and Chronic Exposures

Juana Maria Delgado-Saborit
Adobi Okam
Maryam Shehab
Tuan van Vu
September 2018
Unpublished report

This unpublished report describes a three-year study aimed at evaluating exposures to air pollutants from traffic and indoor sources. The study followed a panel of participants who lived close to or further away from busy roads and had either gas or electric stoves. The investigators measured the participants’ exposures indoors and outdoors, as well as their personal exposures in various microenvironments, using real-time pollutant sensors that were fairly novel at the time.

Update Summer 2018

Health Effects Institute
August 2018
Newsletter

In this issue of Update, read about HEI’s recent testimony on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed “Strengthening Transparency in Regulatory Science” rule; a recap of the 2018 Annual Conference in Chicago, Illinois; a new HEI Communication assessing the evidence on health effects from household air pollution; progress in the new Energy Research Program; and more.

Household Air Pollution and Noncommunicable Disease

HEI Household Air Pollution Working Group
July 2018
Communication 18

Communication 18 provides a critical assessment of the state of the science examining the linkages between household air pollution formed by the burning of solid fuels and noncommunicable diseases. The report updates previous systematic reviews with the most recent studies. It answers fundamental questions on the scientific basis for estimating health burden and what the evidence suggests about the exposure reductions necessary to achieve improved health outcomes. The Summary for Policy Makers, based on Communication 18, presents the main conclusions about exposures to household air pollution and about its contribution to noncommunicable diseases globally.

Evaluation of Alternative Sensor-based Exposure Assessment Methods

Edmond Seto
Elena Austin
Graeme Carvlin
Jeffry Shirai
Alan Hubbard
Katherine Hammond
Ying-Ying Meng
Michael Jerrett
Ronald Cohen
July 2018
Unpublished report

This unpublished report describes a one-year study aimed at evaluating low-cost sensors in a dense network of near-road monitoring sites in the San Francisco Bay area. The overarching goal was to evaluate the ability of low-cost sensors to characterize traffic-related air pollution. The specific aims were to (1) colocate and compare low-cost sensors with regulatory instruments and (2) evaluate the ability of the low-cost sensors to characterize variations in traffic-related air pollution that are associated with different traffic counts. The topic of the study is of interest since the development and use of low-cost air pollution sensors are progressing rapidly, and these sensors have the potential to transform the way air pollution research is conducted.