Publications

This page is a list of publications in reverse chronological order. Please use search or the filters to browse by research areas, publication types, and content types.

Displaying 241 - 250 of 289. Show 10 | 25 | 50 | 100 results per page.


The Effects of Exercise on Dose and Dose Distribution of Inhaled Automotive Pollutants

Michael T Kleinman
William J Mautz
October 1991
Research Report 45

The human health effects that result from breathing air pollutants depend on the amount of pollutant inhaled from the air (exposure dose) and the amount of inhaled material that stays in the respiratory tract (retained dose). Because the retained dose of a pollutant may damage the respiratory tract and cause disease, it is a key factor for determining appropriate government regulations for air pollutants. Drs.

Leukocyte-Mediated Epithelial Injury in Ozone-Exposed Rat Lung

Kenneth Donaldson
Geraldine M Brown
David M Brown
Joan Slight
William M Maclaren
John MG Davis
October 1991
Research Report 44

Ozone is a highly reactive gas that is a pervasive air pollutant at ground level. It is a major component of urban smog, forming when emissions from mobile and industrial sources interact with sunlight. When inhaled, ozone can cause cough, shortness of breath, and transient changes in breathing patterns; however the health significance of these effects is unknown. Drs. Kenneth Donaldson and coworkers at the Institute of Occupational Medicine examined whether exposure to ozone activates white blood cells to release substances that can damage lung tissue.

Effects of Methanol Vapor on Human Neurobehavioral Measures

Mary R Cook
Fred J Bergman
Harvey D Cohen
Mary M Gerkovich
Charles Graham
Roger K Harris
Linda G Siemann
August 1991
Research Report 42

In this pilot study, Dr. Mary Cook and colleagues at the Midwest Research Institute explored how exposure to methanol vapor might affect the human nervous system. Methanol could be used as an alternative fuel, but it may lead to increased levels of methanol and formaldehyde in the atmosphere. The investigators exposed 12 young male volunteers to either filtered air or methanol vapor and assessed their response using 20 commonly used tests of sensory, behavioral, and reasoning performance before, during, and after each exposure.

Mechanisms of Nitrogen Dioxide Toxicity in Humans

Mark J Utell
Mark W Frampton
Norbert J Roberts Jr
Jacob N Finkelstein
Christopher Cox
Paul E Morrow
August 1991
Research Report 43

Nitrogen dioxide is an ubiquitous air pollutant that can react with and damages lung cells when inhaled at high levels. Although outdoor and indoor levels of nitrogen dioxide are usually below the annual standard of 0.053 ppm, peaks can occur that reach up to 10 times this standard. Dr. Mark Utell and coworkers at the University of Rochester examined the human health impacts of higher (peak) levels of nitrogen dioxide that exceed the annual standard. The investigators exposed healthy, nonasthmatic, human volunteers to either nitrogen dioxide or filtered air for three hours.

Retention Modeling of Diesel Exhaust Particles in Rats and Humans

CP Yu
KJ Yoon
May 1991
Research Report 40

This report describes a study by Drs. Yu and Yoon to mathematically predict the lung burden in rats and humans of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) from automobile emissions. Building on a previously constructed model describing DEP deposition, the present work focused on clearance and retention of DEPs deposited in the lung. The transport rates of each component of DEPs were derived using experimental data and mathematical approximations. The complete model was first developed for rats and then extrapolated to humans of different age groups.

Effects of 4 Percent and 6 Percent Carboxyhemoglobin on Arrhythmia Production in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

David S Sheps
Margaret C Herbst
Alan L Hinderliter
Kirkwood F Adams
Lars G Ekelund
John J O'Neil
George M Goldstein
Philip A Bromberg
Martha Ballanger
Sonia M Davis
Gary Koch
May 1991
Research Report 41

Dr. Sheps and colleagues assessed the effect of exposure to carbon monoxide (CO) on ventricular arrhythmias in 41 nonsmoking human volunteers with coronary artery disease. On 3 consecutive days, volunteers were exposed in random order to air, 100 ppm CO (target 4% carboxyhemoglobin), and 200 ppm CO (target 6% carboxyhemoglobin), followed by a bicycle exercise test. Radionuclide cardiac ventriculography and ambulatory electrocardiogram were performed at rest and during exercise.

Noninvasive Determination of Respiratory Ozone Absorption: Development of a Fast-Responding Ozone Analyzer

James S Ultman
Abdellaziz Ben-Jebria
March 1991
Research Report 39

This report describes a study by Drs. Ultman and Ben-Jebria to develop a chemiluminescent ozone analyzer and constructed an ozone bolus generator with the goal of using bolus concentration-response methods to noninvasively measure the longitudinal distribution of ozone absorption in human lungs. The analyzer was based on the chemiluminescent reaction between 2-methyl-2-butene and ozone. Validation of the system was performed in excised pig and sheep tracheas, and the resulting absorption coefficient was computed.

Asbestos in Public and Commercial Buildings

Health Effects Institute
January 1991
Special Report

The Special Report Asbestos in Public and Commercial Buildings: A Literature Review and Synthesis of Current Knowledge (1991) describes the findings of the Asbestos Literature Review Panel, which was charged to determine what was known, not known, and uncertain about the risks of exposure to asbestos in public buildings.

Synergistic Effects of Air Pollutants: Ozone Plus a Respirable Aerosol

Jerold A Last
January 1991
Research Report 38

This report describes a study by Dr. Last to investigate possible synergistic effects of multiple air pollutants on pulmonary measures in rats. Rats were exposed for 1-9 days to mixtures of O3 or NO2 and aerosols of sulfuric acid, ammonium sulfate, or sodium chloride, and to each pollutant individually. Responses were evaluated by various biochemical and morphometric analyses of lung tissue and lavage fluid. An additional preliminary experiment treated exposed rats in vivo with various free-radical scavengers to elucidate possible protective properties.

Carbon Monoxide and Lethal Arrhythmias

Jay P Farber
Peter J Schwartz
Emilio Vanoli
Marco Stramba-Badiale
Gaetano M De Ferrari
December 1990
Research Report 36

This report describes a study by Dr. Farber and colleagues to investigate the effect of carbon monoxide (CO) exposure on cardiac parameters in dogs. They tested dogs that developed ventricular fibrillation during a test of exercise and acute myocardial ischemia (i.e. that were susceptible) and dogs that survived the test without fatal arrhythmias (i.e that were resistant). Susceptible and resistant dogs were exposed to a concentration of CO sufficient to raise carboxyhemoglobin levels to 5 – 15%.